uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3
uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3
uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3
uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3
uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3
uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!
Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!
This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 
Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!
Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here! 
-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.
PZ5.P86 T3

uispeccoll:

Happy Birthday Beatrix Potter!

Today we celebrate the 148th birthday of the famous children’s author, Beatrix Potter, who is mainly known for writing The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Here at the University of Iowa, we are fortunate enough to have a copy of one of the first printings of this charming tale, which according to our acquisition papers, was previously owned by Potter’s niece!

This particular book was printed in a grouping of 250, and is widely believed to have been done so in 1901. However, the acquisition papers accompanying this copy state that the author’s records say it was privately printed in 1900, and later issued in 1901. This copy is also interesting as it contains the later omitted pages showing how Peter Rabbit’s father met his demise by way of pie. 

Want to see the fully digitized version of this book? Click here!

Want to learn more about this and other Beatrix Potter books at Iowa? Click here

-Beatrix Potter aficionado, Lindsay M.

PZ5.P86 T3

(via this-first-year)

princeofsparkles:

Look at this handsome fellow!

He is the handsomest cat I know. And I know a lot of cats. Also, he’s going to be in the next RLTR!

If you’re ever looking for something that will make you feel just a little bit better and a little bit worse at the same time.

rdhw:

patrickianmoss:

In honor of Batman Day, here are a few silly Dark Knight comics I drew in 2012.

Happy Batman day, ya’ll. Here’s my RDHW Dark Knight Rises comic strip trilogy from 2012.
rdhw:

patrickianmoss:

In honor of Batman Day, here are a few silly Dark Knight comics I drew in 2012.

Happy Batman day, ya’ll. Here’s my RDHW Dark Knight Rises comic strip trilogy from 2012.
rdhw:

patrickianmoss:

In honor of Batman Day, here are a few silly Dark Knight comics I drew in 2012.

Happy Batman day, ya’ll. Here’s my RDHW Dark Knight Rises comic strip trilogy from 2012.

rdhw:

patrickianmoss:

In honor of Batman Day, here are a few silly Dark Knight comics I drew in 2012.

Happy Batman day, ya’ll. Here’s my RDHW Dark Knight Rises comic strip trilogy from 2012.

(via this-first-year)

poetrysince1912:

Chicagoans may have seen Poetry Cabs driving around town.
On a windy April day, PoFo people emerged from the Poetry Foundation building to break for a fun photo shoot with one of the Poetry Taxis. We’ve gone around and asked those staff members for their favorite poems, Poetry issues, or other poetry things on our site and in our building.
For our first staff pick, we have finance and administration associate Dylan Swisher, who reads and draws with kids in our library almost every week during Children’s Poemtime. Dylan, who is sitting in the back seat, loved the Lemony Snicket section, Poetry Not Written For Children That Children Might Nevertheless Enjoy from the September 2013 issue of Poetry and especially recommends Snicket’s footnotes.
Events and logistics manager Ashley Sheehan, in the front seat, had two poems in mind: ‘My pick is this poem by Katherine Coles from our May issue: “Kept in Mind." I also really enjoy this poem from the July 1980 issue of Poetry that felt fitting given the weather: “Seasonal Change” by Diana Ó Hehir.’

Look at them go!! poetrysince1912:

Chicagoans may have seen Poetry Cabs driving around town.
On a windy April day, PoFo people emerged from the Poetry Foundation building to break for a fun photo shoot with one of the Poetry Taxis. We’ve gone around and asked those staff members for their favorite poems, Poetry issues, or other poetry things on our site and in our building.
For our first staff pick, we have finance and administration associate Dylan Swisher, who reads and draws with kids in our library almost every week during Children’s Poemtime. Dylan, who is sitting in the back seat, loved the Lemony Snicket section, Poetry Not Written For Children That Children Might Nevertheless Enjoy from the September 2013 issue of Poetry and especially recommends Snicket’s footnotes.
Events and logistics manager Ashley Sheehan, in the front seat, had two poems in mind: ‘My pick is this poem by Katherine Coles from our May issue: “Kept in Mind." I also really enjoy this poem from the July 1980 issue of Poetry that felt fitting given the weather: “Seasonal Change” by Diana Ó Hehir.’

Look at them go!!

poetrysince1912:

Chicagoans may have seen Poetry Cabs driving around town.

On a windy April day, PoFo people emerged from the Poetry Foundation building to break for a fun photo shoot with one of the Poetry Taxis. We’ve gone around and asked those staff members for their favorite poems, Poetry issues, or other poetry things on our site and in our building.

For our first staff pick, we have finance and administration associate Dylan Swisher, who reads and draws with kids in our library almost every week during Children’s Poemtime. Dylan, who is sitting in the back seat, loved the Lemony Snicket section, Poetry Not Written For Children That Children Might Nevertheless Enjoy from the September 2013 issue of Poetry and especially recommends Snicket’s footnotes.

Events and logistics manager Ashley Sheehan, in the front seat, had two poems in mind: ‘My pick is this poem by Katherine Coles from our May issue: “Kept in Mind." I also really enjoy this poem from the July 1980 issue of Poetry that felt fitting given the weather: “Seasonal Change” by Diana Ó Hehir.’

Look at them go!!

“In case of being swallowed by a wolf, always bring a good book and a pillow and a blanket. Nothing in this world lasts forever. Certainly not wolves.”
— Sasha Fletcher, “in case you are swallowed by a wolf,” published in Blunderbuss Magazine (via bostonpoetryslam)
handsome-robot:

laughingsquid:

You Are A…

The four things i tell myself when i look in the mirror every morning


Books, please. Tell me something I don’t know. handsome-robot:

laughingsquid:

You Are A…

The four things i tell myself when i look in the mirror every morning


Books, please. Tell me something I don’t know. handsome-robot:

laughingsquid:

You Are A…

The four things i tell myself when i look in the mirror every morning


Books, please. Tell me something I don’t know. handsome-robot:

laughingsquid:

You Are A…

The four things i tell myself when i look in the mirror every morning


Books, please. Tell me something I don’t know.

handsome-robot:

laughingsquid:

You Are A…

The four things i tell myself when i look in the mirror every morning

Books, please. Tell me something I don’t know.

(via rust-and-stardustt)

npr:

In ‘Little Engine That Could,’ Some See An Early Feminist Hero" via Elizabeth Blair

Was “I think I can” the great-grandmother of “lean in?” Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.

Image: Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

NPR at it again with the interesting reads.

Why does her revenge take place in the Wild West? Seems a little far from Bavaria, if you ask me. Also, is her hair alive??? It looks very Medusa-y.